A man may have no bad habits and have worse.
—Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.
The starting point of this lecturing-trip around the world was Paris, where we had been living a year or two.
We sailed for America, and there made certain preparations. This took but little time. Two members of my family elected to go with me. Also a carbuncle. The dictionary says a carbuncle is a kind of jewel. Humor is out of place in a dictionary.
We started westward from New York in midsummer, with Major Pond to manage the platform-business as far as the Pacific. It was warm work, all the way, and the last fortnight of it was suffocatingly smoky, for in Oregon and British Columbia the forest fires were raging. We had an added week of smoke at the seaboard, where we were obliged to wait awhile for our ship. She had been getting herself ashore in the smoke, and she had to be docked and repaired.
We sailed at last; and so ended a snail-paced march across the continent, which had lasted forty days.

[See North American Tour of 1895]

Image
Submitted by scott on Sun, 08/14/2016 - 14:43

Include an itinerary of Twain's Journey...

The first eight chapters of Mark Twain's book cover his voyage across the Pacific to Australia. He stops at Hawaii but cannot go ashore due to cholera, but does go ashore at Fiji. While en route he finds a book by Captain William Wawn, a former labor recruiter, and a pamphlet by the missionary William Gray. From these sources Twain offers a large section on the recruitment of South Seas Islanders to Australia's Queensland colony. Twain did not visit Queensland.

27 August

Mark Twain was in Australia from September of 1895 to January of 1896. Part of that time, some of November and December, was spent in New Zealand. Australia was not a unified country at this time but consisted of seven separate British territories. Twain visited the four southeastern territories: New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania. He saw the shoreline of Western Australia from his ship, the Oceana, en route to Ceylon. It anchored off-shore from Albany January 4th, 1896.

After visits to Maryborough and some other Australian towns, we presently took passage for New Zealand. If it would not look too much like showing off, I would tell the reader where New Zealand is; for he is as I was; he thinks he knows. And he thinks he knows where Hertzegovina is; and how to pronounce pariah; and how to use the word unique without exposing himself to the derision of the dictionary. But in truth, he knows none of these things. There are but four or five people in the world who possess this knowledge, and these make their living out of it.

This is indeed India!

April 7. We are far abroad upon the smooth waters of the Indian Ocean, now; it is shady and pleasant and peaceful under the vast spread of the awnings, and life is perfect again—ideal.
The difference between a river and the sea is, that the river looks fluid, the sea solid—usually looks as if you could step out and walk on it.

Citations

Twain, Mark. 1897. Following The Equator. American Publishing Company.
Strathcarron, Ian. 2013. The Indian Equator. Mineola, New York: Dover Publications, Inc.