Submitted by scott on Sun, 05/22/2022 - 10:09
Railroad Class

An anecdote found in Day By Day for March 4, 1906:

Mark Twain Got the Stateroom.

“I was an organization once. I was traveling from Chicago with my publisher and stenographer —I always travel with a bodyguard—and engaged a stateroom on a certain train. For above all its other conveniences, the stateroom gives the privilege of smoking. When we arrived at the station the conductor told us he was sorry the car with our stateroom was left off. I said: ‘You are under contract to furnish a stateroom on this train. I am in no hurry. I can stay here a week at the road’s expense. It’ll have to pay my expenses and a little over.’ “Then the conductor called a grandee, and, after some argument, he went and bundled some meek people out of the stateroom, told them something not strictly true, and gave it to me.  About 11 o’clock the conductor looked in on me, and was very kind and winning. He told me he knew my father-in-law—it was much more respectable to know my father-in-law than me in those days. Then he developed his game. He was very sorry the car was only going to Harrisburg. They had telegraphed to Harrisburg, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, and couldn’t get another car. He threw himself on my mercy. But to him I only replied: “ ‘Then you had better buy the car.’

“I had forgotten all about this, when some time after Mr. Thomson of the Pennsylvania heard I was going to Chicago again and wired: “ ‘I am sending my private car. Clemens cannot ride on an ordinary car. He costs too much.’ “
 

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