• Innocents Abroad

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/13/2021 - 00:21

    This book is a record of a pleasure trip. If it were a record of a solemn scientific expedition, it would have about it that gravity, that profundity, and that impressive incomprehensibility which are so proper to works of that kind, and withal so attractive. Yet notwithstanding it is only a record of a pic-nic, it has a purpose, which is to suggest to the reader how he would be likely to see Europe and the East if he looked at them with his own eyes instead of the eyes of those who traveled in those countries before him.

  • 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:12

    1867 – Camfield [bibliog.] lists the following pieces undated for this year:
    An unfinished script for a play, “The Quaker City Holy Land Excursion”
    “Goodbye” printed posthumously by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Apr. 27, 1910
    “Who Was He? A Novel” posthumously, Satires and Burlesques, p. 25

  • January 30, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:13

    January 30 Wednesday – At the end of January, New York papers announced the “members of
    Beecher’s congregation are organizing an excursion to the Holy Land, Crimea and Greece. They
    propose to charter a steamer, and leave in June. Rev. Mr. Beecher and family go with them” [MTL 2:
    14]. On this date the Alta California posted the announcement. Sanborn claims Sam learned of the
    planned excursion “sometime after mid-February,” but it is likely that Sam would have noticed the
    wide exposure within a few days [Sanborn 319].

  • June 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June – William Morris Stewart (1827-1909) wrote to Sam sometime during the month offering
    Clemens a secretaryship at Washington. See Aug. 9 for Sam’s reply [MTP].

  • June 1, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 1 Saturday – Sam wrote from New York to his mother and family in St. Louis, irritated about
    the wait, and uncertain if the Quaker City would even sail. He was no doubt down about the
    withdrawal of General Sherman and Henry Ward Beecher, and pressed to finish his writing duties
    All I do know or feel, is, that I am wild with impatience to move—move—Move! …Curse the endless
    delays! They always kill me—make me neglect every duty & then I have a conscience that tears me

  • June 2, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 2 Sunday – Alta California printed Sam’s article “THE MORMONS,” which Sam had dated
    April 19 [Schmidt]. Camfield lists this as “Letter from Mark Twain” No. 15 [bibliog.].

  • June 3 or 4, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 3 or 4 Tuesday – Sam agreed to write letters during the trip for the New York Tribune and the
    New York Herald, at the rates of $40 to $50 dollars per column of type. He eventually published six
    letters in the Tribune and four in the Herald [MTL 2: 55n3]. Note: Sam may have hated the duty of
    writing his correspondent letters, but he didn’t shirk from loading his plate with more duty. This was
    due to an overabundance of affection for money, preferably not in greenbacks.

  • June 5, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 5 Wednesday – Sam wrote to the Alta his impressions of New York, so different they were from
    those of his first visit in 1853: “I have at last, after several months’ experience, made up my mind that
    it is a splendid desert—a domed and steepled solitude, where the stranger is lonely in the midst of a
    million of his race” [MTNJ 1: 301]. Note: the letter was printed in the Alta on August 11.

  • June 6, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 6 Thursday – The get-together at the Moses Beach house in Brooklyn (Beach was neighbor to
    Henry Ward Beecher there) came off as planned (See Sam’s June 1 letter to his mother). The New
    York Sun reported that 70 guests, passengers awaiting departure on the Quaker City, enjoyed an
    “excellent repast,” and that “Mark Twain …enlivened the company with ebul[l]itions of wit” [MTL 2:
    51n2].
    In Mark Twain to Mrs. Fairbanks, p. xi, Wecter writes:
    On the evening of June 7, 1867, some sixty persons, largely unknown to each other, gathered at 66

  • June 7, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 7 Friday – Sam wrote from New York to “my oldest friend,” Will Bowen in Hannibal.
    “We leave tomorrow at 3:00 P.M. Everything is ready but my trunks. I will pack them first thing in the
    morning. We have got a crowd of tiptop people, & shall have a jolly, sociable, homelike trip of it for
    the next five or six months” [MTL 2: 54].
    On this same day Sam wrote to his mother and family in St. Louis. This letter contains evidence that
    Sam visited Dan Slote’s house before leaving New York. Sam teased his mother:

  • June 8, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 8 Saturday – Quaker City left New York at 2 PM for excursion to the Holy Land, the first
    organized pleasure party ever assembled for a transatlantic voyage. The ship carried only 65
    passengers, way short of the 110 limit. Few were from Plymouth Church. Due to rough seas the ship
    got only as far as Gravesend Bay, off Brooklyn. The captain elected to drop anchor and wait out the
    storm for two days. Sam finished a letter (started June 1) before the steamer left port to Frank Fuller,

  • June 9, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 9 Sunday – From Sam’s notebook:
    Sunday Morning—June 9—Still lying at anchor in N.Y. harbor—rained all night & all morning
    like the devil—some sea on—lady had to leave church in the cabin—sea-sick.
    Rev. Mr. Bullard preached from II Cor. 7 & 8th verses about something.
    Everybody ranged up & down sides of upper after cabin—Capt Duncan’s little son played the
    organ—
    Tableau–in the midst of sermon Capt. Duncan rushed madly out with one of those d—d dogs but
    didn’t throw him overboard [MTNJ 1: 331-32].

  • June 10, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 10 Monday – The Quaker City finally put out to sea at 12:30 PM. A lot of the passengers were
    seasick. “We all like to see people seasick when we are not, ourselves” [IA, Ch 3].
    For the most part, Sam thought the passengers were staid stuffed shirts. “I was on excellent terms with
    eight or nine of the excursionists,” Sam wrote later in Innocents Abroad, “(they are my staunch friends
    yet) and was even on speaking terms with the rest of the sixty-five.”
    Among these favorites were, Charles Jervis Langdon (1849-1916), John A. (Jack) Van

  • June 11, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 11 Tuesday – Captain Charles Duncan recorded the noon hailing of the Emerald Isle, which,
    according to the NY Times, left Liverpool on May 12 [MTNJ 1: 333n76]. Note: after several days at
    sea without seeing a soul, this would have been cause for interest among the passengers.

  • June 13, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 13 Thursday – From Sam’s notebook:
    —On board Steamer Quaker City at sea, 12 M—lat.40, long 62—560 miles from New York, ¼ of the
    way to the Azores—just 3 days out—in last 24 hours made 205 miles. Will make more in next 24,
    because the wind is fair & we are under sail & steam both, & are burning 30 tons of coal a day & fast
    lightening up the ship [MTNJ 1: 335].

  • June 14, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 14 Friday – From Sam’s notebook:
    “Shipped a sea through the open dead-light that damaged cigars, books, &c—comes of being careless
    when room is on weather side of the ship….Mrs. C.C. Duncan’s 46 birth-day festival in the after-
    cabin” [Ibid.]
    Emily Severance recorded most of what Sam said at the festivities:
    This is Mrs. Duncan’s birthday. I make this statement to gain time. You have spoken of her youthful
    appearance, but I think she is old. Our life is not counted by years, but by what has been seen and

  • June 15, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 15 Saturday – Sam entertained some of the passengers by holding a mock trial of the purser for
    “stealing an overcoat belonging to Sam Clemens” [MTNJ 1: 336].

  • June 16, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 16 Sunday – Alta California printed Sam’s article “JEFF DAVIS,” which Sam dated May 17
    [Schmidt]. Camfield lists this as “Letter from Mark Twain” No. 17 [bibliog.].

  • June 17, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 17 Monday – From Sam’s notebook:
    Blackfish, whales, an occasional shark & lots of Portuguese men-of-war in sight. Brown distressed for
    fear the latter would attack the ship….Caught a flying fish—it flew 50 yards & came aboard—can’t
    fly after wind & sun dry their wings….Lat. 40, long. 43W—1/2 way between America & Portugal &
    away south of Cape Farewell, Greenland. Large school of spouting blackfish—make the water white
    with their spouting spray [MTNJ 1: 337].
    One of three dances was held on board the Quaker City [MTL 70n5].

  • June 19, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 19 Wednesday – From Sam’s notebook:
    June 19—Within 136 miles of the Azores at noon. / D r & S get sea-sick at table—go out & throw up &
    return for more….
    Started a Social Club last night to discuss routes of travel, & chose Judge Haldeman for President,
    —Rev Mr Carew for Secretary, & Moses S. Beach, Dr. Jackson & myself as Executive Committee.
    Dr. [Edward] Andrews & Capt Duncan enlightened the Club concerning the Azores & Gibraltar.

  • June 20, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 20 Thursday – A violent storm drove the QC to Fayal (see June 21 entry.) Sam’s notebook:
    “Questions for debate.
    Which is the most powerful motive—Duty or Ambition?
    Is or is not Capt. Duncan responsible for the head winds?” [MTNJ 1: 340].

  • June 21, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 21 Friday – The Quaker City (subsequently noted here as QC) arrived at Horta, island of Fayal,
    in the Azores at daylight.
    At three o’clock on the morning of the 21 of June we were awakened and notified that the Azores
    islands were in sight. I said I did not take any interest in islands at three o’clock in the morning. But
    another persecutor came, and then another and another, and finally believing that the general
    enthusiasm would permit no one to slumber in peace, I got up and went sleepily on deck [Innocents
    Abroad, Ch 5].

  • June 22, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 22 Saturday – From Sam’s notebook:
    The party started at 10 A.M. Dan was on his ass the last time I saw him. At this time Mr. Foster was
    following, & Mr. Haldeman came next after Foster—Mr. Foster being close to Dan’s ass, & his own
    ass being very near to Mr. Haldeman’s ass. After this Capt. Bursley joined the party with his ass, & all
    went well till on turning a corner of the road a most frightful & unexpected noise issued from Capt

  • June 23, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 23 Sunday – QC departed Horta at 11 AM
    “The group on the pier was a rusty one—men and women, boys and girls, all ragged and barefoot,
    uncombed and unclean, and by instinct, education, an profession, beggars. …and never more, while
    we tarried in Fayal, did we get rid of them” [Innocents Abroad, Ch. 5].
    Alta California printed Sam’s article “THE NUISANCE OF ADVICE,” which Sam had dated May 18
    [Schmidt]. Camfield lists this as “Letter from Mark Twain” No. 18 [bibliog.].

  • June 24 to June 27, 1867

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:16

    June 24 to June 27 Thursday – The New York Weekly published the last of five of Sam’s Sandwich
    Islands Letters. From Sam’s notebook:

    “Had Ball No. 2 on promenade deck, under lanterns (no awning but heaven) but ship pitched so & dew
    kept deck so slippery, was little more fun than comfort about it” [MTNJ 1: 348].