• Sacramento to Meadow Lake

    Submitted by scott on Sat, 11/13/2021 - 09:47

    From Sacramento, "They steamed inland on the Flora to Marysville on the Feather River..."  (pg 356 Scharnhorst V1)

    From Marysville,  "They then took a stage to Grass Valley..." 

    Scharhorst reports that Twain spent the night in Meadow Lake, a mining camp  where Orion had previously lived.  It is currently a ghost town on the map called Summit City.

  • October 11 to November 27, 1866

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 17:56

    October 11 to November 27 Tuesday – Sam and Denis McCarthy, former part-owner of the
    Territorial Enterprise, (who Sam now labeled “The Orphan,” quickly organized a lecture tour in
    California and Nevada. (Lorch gives strong reasoning that the subsequent lecture tour was most likely
    organized well before this Oct. 2 debut [35-6]). The lecture, titled “Sandwich Islands” made sixteen
    engagements between these dates at locations where Sam was well known [Sanborn 298-9]. Dates in

  • October 15, 1866

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:08

    October 15 Monday – Sam and Denis McCarthy traveled by riverboat to Marysville,
    California (named for Mary Murphy, a survivor of the Donner Party). There, Sam gave the lecture
    “Sandwich Islands” at Maguire’s New Theatre [Sanborn 299].

  • October 17, 1866

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:08

    October 17 Wednesday – Sam’s article dated “Sept. 24, San Francisco, An Epistle from Mark Twain
    THE QUEEN’S ARRIVAL / ALPHABET WARREN / MISC.” ran in the Daily Hawaiian
    Herald [Schmidt; Camfield bibliog.].

  • October 20, 1866

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 17:56

    October 20 Saturday – Sam and McCarthy traveled by stage through gold boomtowns, Timbuctoo,
    Smartsville, and Rough and Ready (in modern days nearly empty). Sam gave the lecture “Sandwich Islands” in Hamilton Hall, Grass Valley, California. The Grass Valley Daily Union reported:
    Crowds are flocking into Hamilton Hall, as we write, to hear Mark Twain’s lecture….But a moment
    ago we saw the lecturer preparing himself for a clear voice with a copious dose of gin and gam, after

  • October 23, 1866

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 17:56

    October 23 Tuesday – Sam gave the lecture “Sandwich Islands,” in the Nevada Theatre in Nevada
    City, California, a short distance from Grass Valley. Sam stayed at the National Exchange Hotel.
    The local newspaper Transcript wrote: “Mark Twain” as a lecturer is far superior to “Artemus Ward” or any of that class….We bespeak for
    him large audiences wherever he goes [Sanborn 300].

  • October 24, 1866

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:08

    October 24 Wednesday – Sam and McCarthy rode horseback to the old mining camp of Red Dog,
    California and gave the “Sandwich Islands” lecture at the Odd Fellows Hall.

  • October 25, 1866

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:09

    October 25 Thursday – Sam’s 24 th letter to the Union dated “Kilauea, June 1866: A NOTABLE
    DISCOVERY” ran in the Union:
    FREE-AND-EASY FASHIONS OF NATIVE WOMEN
    Tired and over-heated, we plodded back to the ruined temple. We were blistered on face and hands,
    our clothes were saturated with perspiration and we were burning with thirst. Brown ran, the last
    hundred yards, and with out waiting to take off anything but his coat and boots jumped into the sea,
    bringing up in the midst of a party of native girls who were bathing. They scampered out, with a

  • October 26, 1866

    Submitted by scott on Sun, 10/31/2021 - 22:08

    October 26 Friday – Sam and McCarthy stopped to see Meadow Lake City, also known as
    Summit City, Ca., the highest of the gold mining districts at 7,100 feet and the place where
    Orion Clemens had briefly tried a legal office. They arrived at 9 PM [Schmidt: article from S.F.
    Bulletin, ran Dec. 6].
    “A bright, new, pretty town, all melancholy and deserted, and yet not showing one sign of decay or
    delapidation! I never saw the like before” [Note: By 1872 the town was abandoned; Sanborn 301].