• January 1, 1881

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 1 Saturday – Sam and Livy struggled with sick children.

    On Jan. 9 Sam wrote his mother that Susy had been: “…taken sick, & Livy removed her to our room & tended her two or three days & nights. New Years’ morning she was well again; but Bay was taken alarmingly ill that night—threatened with membranous croup” [MTBus 149].

    Bills/receipts/statements from Hartford merchants:

    Sam paid for the Daily Courant, period Oct. 1, 1880 to Jan. 1, 1881.

  • January 2, 1881

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 2 Sunday – A fire started in Sam and Livy’s bedroom from a hot croup-kettle and spread to Clara Clemens’ crib and canopy. Rosa, the German nursemaid, “snatched Bay from the midst of the flames, just in time to save her life.” Sam and Rosa threw the burning bedclothes out the window. Sam wrote that “it looked, for awhile, as if the house must go” [MTBus 149]. In his Oct. 3, 1906 A.D. Clemens related that the Polish wet-nurse should have been there but was not: Julia Koshloshky. See also Harnsberger, p. 28-9.

  • January 4, 1881

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 4 Tuesday – The Jan. 31 bill from Western Union shows a telegram sent to Elmira on this date, recipient unspecified (see that entry).

  • January 5, 1881

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 5 Wednesday – Sam wrote to James R. Osgood:

    My Dear Osgood— / All right—shall expect you Friday.

    Would have written you sooner, but one of the children has been lying very close to the grave ever since New Years’ night, & was not declared out of danger till yesterday evening. / Truly Yours, / S.L. Clemens [ABE Books, Between the Covers-Rare Books, Inc. 6/11/2010]. Note: Clara Clemens was ill for several days, following Susie’s illness. See Jan. 3 to Conway.

  • January 6, 1881

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 6 Thursday – The Jan. 31 bill from Western Union shows a telegram sent to Elmira on this date, recipient unspecified (see that entry). The Feb. 1 bill from Atlantic & Pacific Telegraph Co. shows a telegram sent to Elmira on this date, recipient unspecified (see that entry).

    William H. Thompson for Hubbard Bros., book publishers, Phila. wrote to ask Sam to edit some work sent (nearly illegible) [MTP]. Note: Sam wrote on the env., “Genus of the Fireside / Nerve & Impudence” SASE remains unused in file.

  • January 1882

    Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 10/25/2021 - 17:47

    January – Sometime during the month Sam wrote to Will Clemens (no relation, see Nov. 18, 1879 entry) who had asked for a humorous biography of Sam.

    “I haven’t any humorous biography—the facts don’t admit of it. I had this sketch from Men of the Time printed on slips to enable me to study my history at my leisure” [Clemens, W. 20].

    Will did write a 200-page biography of Sam and published it on July 1, 1892 as “No. 1” in a paperback series called “The Pacific Library.”

    Sam also wrote to Whitelaw Reid sometime during January:

  • January 1, 1882

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 1 Sunday – Schwartz Bros. (soon to be F.A.O. Schwartz), New York, billed Sam $3.50 for doll parts: “1 head, 1 wig, repackage doll.” Note: stamped on invoice: “bills rendered Jan. May and Oct.”; Park & Tilford, fancy groceries, New York billed Sam $36.88 for two kinds of jelly, “2 doz Glen Whiskey”, paid Jan. 11 [MTP].

  • January 2, 1882

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 2 Monday – Edward House and daughter Koto arrived for a visit. Sam inscribed P&P to Koto, House’s adopted Japanese daughter: To / Koto House / With the affectionate regards of / The Author / Hartford Jan.2, 1882 [MTP]. Note: in his Dec. 27 to House Sam announced Koto would get the China paper edition.

    Sam also wrote to Charles Webster:

    “Dear Charley— Make me a copper stamp. I am on track of a way by which you can harden it afterwards, & make it as hard as brass. I hear this from the head of the Bank Note Co.” [MTP].

  • January 4, 1882

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 4 Wednesday – In Hartford Sam inscribed P&P to A.V.S. Anthony: “To / A.V.S. Anthony / With Sentiments of esteem, / appreciation, & tenderness, / from / The Author / Hartford, Jan. 4, 1882” [MTP].

    Sam also wrote to James R. Osgood about distribution of P&P to British possessions outside of Canada through McMillan. Sam didn’t care how it was done or how many were sold that way, he simply didn’t want cheaper versions flooding into the U.S. He also saw an opportunity to act in concert with Osgood as agents:

  • January 5, 1882

    Submitted by scott on Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:53

    January 5 Thursday – Sam wrote from Hartford to Charles Webster after Bliss telephoned asking if he needed to send the check and statement to Webster. Sam confirmed it. He also wrote:

    “Hang it, I believe your metallurgical authority says copper can’t be cast in anything but sand. I am sorry, if it is so” [MTP].

    Charles Webster wrote: “We cant cast copper or brass in Kaolatype, do you mean for me to make the spelter pattern & then get the copper cast at the foundry?”

    Also more on the Paige typesetter [MTP].