Submitted by scott on Tue, 10/26/2021 - 23:33

November 1 Thursday – In the afternoon the Clemens family moved into 14 W. 10th Avenue in N.Y.C.  [Note: subsequent entries have 1410 W. 10th]

Sam wrote to Frank Bliss.

“Dear Bliss: Do you remember that large photo by Barnett, London? Were you to send it to Mr. Rogers after engraving it? Did you do it? Above is our new address. We are to move in this afternoon. Make a note of it. Yrs. S.L. Clemens” [MTP]. Note: the new address was 14 W. 10th, N.Y.C. H. Walter Barnett, photographer.

Sam also replied to Josephus N. Larned who had been a co-editor with Sam on the Buffalo Express.

“Indeed I have not forgotten you: I have held you in remembrance & affection all these years. And so I wish I could say yes to that pleasant invitation wherewith I am complimented through you, but I must not indulge myself. Will you please convey my thanks & regrets for me?” [MTP]. Note: Larned’s incoming is not extant.

Powers writes of the proximity from the Clemens new abode to that of William Dean Howells:

THE HOWELLSES lived just on the far side of Union Square, at 115 East 16th Street. This was the first time that Clemens and Howells had ever lived within walking distance of each other, something Sam had wished for since the 1870s. They made the most of this proximity. They rejuvenated their long friendship, shifting their passions from the literary world to the political. Howells swept Clemens up into the Anti-Imperialism crusade, introducing him at a Lotos Club dinner on November 10 as the ascendant satirist laureate of the country [MT A Life 604].

November 1, 1900 to June 21, 1901 – At N.Y.C. Sam wrote to an unidentified person: “Rockwood

photographed me some days ago—the best picture I have had in a year or more” [MTP:Walpole Galleries catalogs; noted “untraceable”]. Note: this is headed “Sunday” but Nov. 1 is a Thursday; nevertheless the MTP date period is used here.

Day By Day Acknowledgment

Mark Twain Day By Day was originally a print reference, meticulously created by David Fears, who has generously made this work available, via the Center for Mark Twain Studies, as a digital edition.